Mindfulness Training for Health and Wellbeing

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In the April newsletter, I listed 6 reasons why mindfulness matters including:

  1. 1. Improves one’s ability to regulate emotions.
  2. Cultivates a way of “being” for ourselves that is consistent with how we see ourselves.
  3. Helps to illuminate our motives when we take action
  4. Mindfulness helps to balance thinking other sources of intelligence i.e. emotions and body sensations
  5. Improves interpersonal communication through becoming a better listener
  6. Helps us to recognize and challenge our perceptions of challenges

“Why Mindfulness Matters” in the book “The Mindfulness Revolution” edited by Barry Boyce.

Today, I would like to elaborate briefly on the second reason taken from this list:   Cultivates a way of “being” for ourselves that is consistent with how we see ourselves.

One of the purposes of a mindfulness practice is to help you cultivate a way of being that is consistent with how you see yourself.  How we see ourselves may not become clear and visible until we find ourselves behaving in a way that doesn’t feel right.

For example, do you ever find yourself rushing from one task to another as if you were a  hamster on a wheel.  You get the picture….you are running as fast as you can and the wheel is whirling at top speed.  It is as if you are driven forward by forces beyond your control.

There are times when I have felt like this.  In fact, it happens more regularly than I  like to admit.  It sets up an experience of yourself that may be inconsistent with your image of yourself.  You say to yourself,  “I am not a hamster and I need to get off this wheel or at least slow down if I choose”.

Mindfulness matters as it will help you become familiar with a way of being in ourselves that is calm, stable, dependable and unwavering.  Mindfulness will potentially reveal what is driving you forward.  Once seen and understood,  it will give us the choice of how to behave.  What is important is that it is “ok” to feel like a hamster on a wheel from time to time, but, it is important to know how to slow down.